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    28 Oct 2014

    Studies show that eating chocolate might help improve your memory

    You've already heard that eating a little bit of dark chocolate every day is good for you — it can raise your good cholesterollower your bad cholesterol, and has beenlinked to weight loss. Well, now there's yet another excuse to eat your favorite, no-longer-guilty pleasure: A new study suggests that a compound found in chocolate, dietary cocoa flavanols, can reverse the process of age-related memory loss.
    Scientists at Columbia University Medical Center found that the flavanols increase connectivity and blood flow in a region of the brain critical to memory. Researchers asked 37 participants ranging in age from 50 to 69 to drink either a high-flavanol mixture or a low-flavanol mixture. Subjects who drank the high-flavanol solution performed better on a pattern-recognition test designed to gauge memory, and showed increased function the dentate gyrus, a part of the brain's hippocampus associated with memory.
    Researchers concluded that if a participant had the memory of an average 60-year-old before the study, after three months that person's memory would work more like that of a 30- or 40-year-old, on average.
    It's important to note that the study was financed in part by the chocolate company Mars, Inc. Yes, a company that makes chocolate candy is telling you that it's good for your brain.
    Does this mean you should start stocking up on delicious Mars chocolate products for yourself instead of trick-or-treaters?
    The New York Times thinks not:
     To consume the high-flavanol group's daily dose of epicatechin, 138 milligrams, would take eating at least 300 grams of dark chocolate a day — about seven average-sized bars. Or possibly about 100 grams of baking chocolate or unsweetened cocoa powder, but concentrations vary widely depending on the processing. Milk chocolate has most epicatechin processed out of it.

    "You would have to eat a large amount of chocolate," along with its fat and calories, said Hagen Schroeter, director of fundamental health and nutrition research for Mars, which funds many flavanol studies and approached Dr. Small for this one. "Candy bars don't even have a lot of chocolate in them," Dr. Schroeter said. And "most chocolate uses a process called dutching and alkalization. That's like poison for flavanol."

    Read more:http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-15880/want-to-improve-your-memory-eat-chocolate.html 
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    1. oldranger68October 28, 2014

      We, in Kentucky, have a choice of the two evils, they are Mitch (Evil) and Grimes (Eviler (more evil)). We know that Mitch McConnell is a corrupt piece of trash, but all we are presented with is Jew-backed trash. Grimes will immediately begin to initiate every Obama initiative if she is elected. McConnell will do Obama's bidding because there is no difference between a Republican or a Democrat, but he will do it slowly. All we can do is try to bring in a Republican majority because they will slow down the Communist progress in order to look like they were really in opposition. It will give those of us who can see the martial writing on the wall time to prepare for the coming onslaught.

    2. Baron Von ZipperOctober 28, 2014

      It does not matter; Republican or Democrat, they make it up as they go along.

    3. dougdigglerOctober 28, 2014

      Hopefully, he'll have a fatal accident, real soon.


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