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    13 Mar 2015

    US Senate committee advances cyber-surveillance bill in secret session. Lone dissenter calls measure ‘a surveillance bill by another name’

    The Senate intelligence committee advanced a priority bill for the National Security Agency on Thursday afternoon, approving long-stalled cybersecurity legislation that civil libertarians consider the latest pathway for surveillance abuse. 
    The vote on the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act, 14 to 1, occurred in a secret session inside the Hart Senate office building. Democrat Ron Wyden was the dissenter, calling the measure “a surveillance bill by another name”.
    Senator Richard Burr, the committee chairman, said the bill would create avenues for private-to-private, private-to-government and government-to-private information sharing.
    The bill’s bipartisan advocates consider it a prophylactic measure against catastrophic data theft, particularly in light of recent large-scale hacking of Sony, Target, Home Depot and other companies.
    Private companies could share customer data “in a voluntary capacity” with the government, Burr said, “so that we bring the full strength of the federal government to identifying and recommending what anybody else in the United States should adopt”.
    “The sharing has to be voluntary, not coercive, and it’s got to be protected,” said Senator Dianne Feinstein, the committee’s vice-chair, adding that the information would pass through the Department of Homeland Security – and “transferred in real time to other departments where it’s applicable”.
    Feinstein said the bill’s provisions would “only be used for counterterrorism purposes and certain immediate crimes”.
    Several iterations of the cybersecurity bill have failed in recent years, including a post-Edward Snowden effort that the committee, then under Democratic leadership, approved last year. President Obama, renewing the push earlier this year, has called for a bill to enhance information sharing between businesses particularly banks and others in the financial sector and the federal government surrounding indications of malicious network intrusions.
    Both the administration and Congress intend the legislation to join a panoply of recent moves to bolster cybersecurity, including February’s announced creation of a consolidated center within the intelligence agencies for analysis of internet-borne threats.
    “This bill will not eliminate [breaches] happening,” Burr said. “This bill will hopefully minimize the impact of a penetration because of the real-time response.”
    Feinstein said that companies, “reluctant to share with the government because they are subject to suit” would be protected from lawsuits “for cybersecurity purposes” under the bill.
    But the bill faces strong opposition inside and outside Congress. Beyond expanding government’s reach into private data outside warrant requirements, it mandates real-time access to that data for intelligence agencies and the military.

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